zero-waste

9 Less-Waste Goals: January Update

9 Less-Waste Goals: January Update

January was a quick and focused month around here. I did not blog regularly; my mental energies went almost entirely to implementing our 9 less-waste goals for 2019 and, of course, entering into my third trimester of pregnancy.

As I promised myself, however, I pause now to review and reflect upon the month and our efforts. This is not a shaming protocol, but rather an opportunity to consider what went well, what rose or fell in priority, and how I might proceed this month in the pursuit of embodied and ecologically-conscious love.

9 Less-Waste Goals for 2019

9 Less-Waste Goals for 2019

“Waste” is an anomaly. There is no away in creation; humans are the only species to think up such a thing.

Going zero-waste is an overarching direction in the Coyle-Carr household. We have been working toward sending less to the landfill and decreasing our need for recycling for several years, learning all sorts of creative skills, tips, and crafts along the way.

But as I explored in a recent post, a life that makes “zero” waste in the society in which I live is impossible, which can be disappointing and discouraging if individualistic perfection is what we are after. In the journey toward ecological well-being I have found that perfection is not helpful. Further, it ain’t even the goal.

I want to make less waste and more life!

The goal is to love. And love is the long labor of a lifetime.

Here are some specific ways I hope to press on in love this year.

"Zero" Waste?

"Zero" Waste?

I am shifting away from using the phrase “zero-waste” exclusively because the more I venture toward a holistically integrated life of love the more I realize how “zero” waste is impossible.

Zero-Waste as a movement is a powerful instrument of good. The movement invites and challenges folks to reconsider mainline consumerism as the only way of living. Specifically, Zero-Wasters want to empower folks to put down the fiscally cheap, but environmentally costly plastic and invest in the well-being of the whole earth community. Instead of only Refuse, Reduce, Reuse, and Recycle, we want to live into the truth as nature tells it: there is no away.

Creation in its natural state does not make waste—every single molecule of matter is, rather, transformed from one useful state to the next in order create and sustain more diverse and varied forms of life.

Poop, for instance, is not a toxic problem in nature. Instead it is a biofuel and a fertilizer. Notice the language there—what first-world people have been conditioned to consider the epitome of “waste,” nature sees and names Nourishment and Fertility.

In Which We Talk T.P.: Quick Switch #003

In Which We Talk T.P.: Quick Switch #003

In which we talk toilet paper and creatureliness.

We all go, well, potty, and most of us employ the use of ye ol’ toilet paper. Of course, there is almost an entire continent that goes another route, but today let’s just assume everyone reading is on the roll.

And I promise to keep this short because, uh, I am talking about toilet paper. Yep.

When Traveling

When Traveling

Sustainability on the road surely takes forethought and flexibility. On this trip I practiced more of the latter. Because I had to leave a day earlier than expected to outrun a potential snowstorm, I did not have the chance to prepare quite like I had hoped on the sustainability end of things. Thus, I got a good picture of what choices are within my reach without planning, and how I can prepare best for next time.